Our Teacher Study Seminar series aims to extend historical knowledge, and/or to explore some of the pedagogical challenges of teaching and learning about the Holocaust. These sessions are free to attend and open to anyone who has previously undertaken an introductory teacher training workshop with the Holocaust Educational Trust. 

In July we will be hosting our  Lessons from Auschwitz Online CPD course and our Online Teacher Summer School. Join us as we deepen our discussions about the definition of the Holocaust through an exploration of the persecution of Jewish communities of French North Africa, and workshops exploring the 'Mosaic of Victims', the  diverse experiences of different groups of people who were persecuted by the Nazi regime and its collaborators during the era of the Third Reich. We will host two study workshops exploring the topics of antisemitism, and justice, and a series of Online CPD workshops for primary teachers.

To register for your free place, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Lessons from Auschwitz Online CPD

Sunday 4 July and Sunday 11 July (13.00-17.15)

Teachers of all subjects in state secondary schools and colleges across England are invited to register for this two-part continuing professional development online course.

The course is based on our flagship Lessons from Auschwitz and Lessons from Auschwitz Online programmes for post-16 students. Participating teachers will hear from a Holocaust survivor who will share their testimony and answer questions, have access to the newly created Lessons from Auschwitz Online learning platform and use cutting edge virtual reality technology to engage in sites related to the Holocaust. The course will be led by specialist teacher educators who will model best practice in teaching about the Holocaust.

Teachers who complete the course and attend both sessions will receive hard copies of teaching resources to use in their classroom, a published Holocaust survivor's testimony and a certificate of attendance for their professional development portfolio.

The course is available free of charge with places available for up to four teachers from each secondary school or college to participate – we encourage schools to put forward teachers from a variety of teaching subjects to promote a cross-curricular approach to Holocaust education in schools and colleges.

Places are limited and will be allocated on a first come first serve basis. The deadline for applications is Wednesday, 23rd June 2021.

To apply for this project, please visit our Lessons from Auschwitz Online CPD page.

Online CPD for Primary School Teachers

Monday 26 July (14.30-16.30), Tuesday 27 July (10:00-14:00)

To complement our Lessons from Auschwitz Online CPD for secondary school teachers, we will be hosting a two-part CPD programme for primary school teachers and trainees. These sessions are open to primary school teachers and trainees from across the UK.

On Monday 26 July, join us for our 'Introduction to the Holocaust Educational Trust' workshop for primary school teachers. On Tuesday 27 July we will hear from Eve Kugler BEM who will share her testimony and answer questions; we will also explore how to deepen our classroom discussions through a consideration of Holocaust-related texts for primary.

Jewish Communities of French North Africa

Sunday 25 July (09:30-12:30)

In partnership with Yad Vashem's International School for Holocaust Studies (ISHS) and the Documentation Centre of North-African Jewry during World War II, this seminar will provide teachers with an opportunity to learn about the plight of Jewish communities living in French North Africa. The members of these communities suffered greatly on many fronts akin to and separate from European Jewry. These hardships included the loss of family members in labour and internment camps, deportation to concentration camps in Europe, the exploitation of children through forced labour, expropriation of property, homes destroyed by aerial bombardment, the forced humiliation of wearing a yellow badge, and a constant unnerving uncertainty of what the future would bring.

Our speaker will be Professor Haim Saadoun, Director of the Documentation Center of North-African Jewry during WWII.

The Documentation Center of North-African Jewry during WWII, which operates under the auspices of the Ben-Zvi Institute, was established in 2006 with the purpose of making information on this subject available. The Center seeks to raise the public's consciousness and awareness of the travails of Jews in North Africa by developing a curriculum and training teachers to incorporate the subject within the educational system in addition to advancing academic research.

The Mosaic of Victims

Tuesday 27 July (09:30-16:00)

In connection with the 85-year commemorations of the 1936 Berlin Olympic Games, and the creation of the Berlin-Marzahn camp for Roma, join us as we explore the diverse experiences of different groups of people who were persecuted by the Nazi regime and its collaborators during the era of the Third Reich.

Over four study sessions on Wednesday 28 July, we will deepen our understanding of the persecution of Polish communities; the persecution of gay men; the murder of people with disabilities and the 'Euthanasia' programme; and the genocide of Roma and Sinti communities. Speakers include Professor Rainer Schulze (University of Essex), Associate Professor Danny M. Cohen (Executive Director of Unsilence), and Dr Alasdair Richardson (The University of Winchester).

For those new to teaching about The Mosaic of Victims, we will be hosting a special contextual and pedagogical workshop on Tuesday 27 July (15:00-17:00) exploring our teaching resource and the connected histories contained within.

Exploring Antisemitism

Thursday 29 July (09.30-16.00)

Join us for a day of workshops exploring the history of antisemitism, including discussions about how to identify and challenge antisemitism in your classroom.

Our first session will explore the meaning and history of antisemitism, considering how far Nazi ideology drew on and how far it differed from historical antisemitism. Our second session will explore the antisemitism survivors experienced in the wake of the Holocaust, including discussion of the Kielce pogrom which took place on 4 July 1946. Our final session will explore how to identify antisemitism in your classroom and discuss how we can challenge student misconceptions.

Speakers include Martin Winstone (Senior Historical Advisor at the Holocaust Educational Trust), and Alex Maws (Head of Educational Grants and Projects at the Association of Jewish Refugees).

Justice after the Holocaust: Remembering the Children with Maison d'Izieu

TBC

On 4 July 1987, Klaus Barbie was found guilty of crimes against humanity, and sentenced to life in prison, the maximum penalty permitted under French law. Barbie's crimes included the arrest and deportation to Auschwitz of forty-four children and seven carers, all of whom were Jewish, from the children’s home of Izieu. During the eight-week trial in 1987, testimony was provided by Ita-Rosa Halaunbrenner and Fortunée Benguigui whose children had been among those deported.

This seminar will explore the history of the children's home, the long struggle for justice, and the continued commitment to remember.

 

These sessions are free to attend and open to anyone who has previously undertaken an introductory teacher training workshop with the Holocaust Educational Trust.

To register for your free place, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Academic Year: 2021-2022

Our Online Teacher Study Seminar series will return in October 2021 with a focus on preparing teachers for the theme for Holocaust Memorial Day 2022, ‘One Day’. Proposed sessions will explore the 80-year commemorations of the murders at Babi Yar in Ukraine; the 75-year anniversary of the uncovering of the Oneg Shabbat in Warsaw; the history of the Wannsee Conference; and the 80-year commemorations of the establishment of the Terezín ghetto.

In April 2022 we will be hosting a week of seminars around the theme of ‘Britain and the Holocaust’. This will include sessions designed to prepare teachers for Refugee Week in June 2022.

For more information, please email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..